#WitchyType Book Review: Wicca Herbal Magic by Lisa Chamberlain

Hello there Coven! 

We’ve recently launched the #witchytype book club which is where we read books and share our thoughts on themas well as opening the floor via our digital channels (And upcoming book clubs) to hear your thoughts too.

Check out our book list here: https://digital-coven.com/witchytype-book-club/

Including the upcoming witchcraft, Tarot and spiritual books that we are going to be reviewing as well as books and goodies that you can win in competitions. We also have the Digital Coven book depository with Witchcraft, Tarot and spiritual books available to borrow or lend out. If you want to donate or borrow a book from our book depository, you can find out what books are available in our sharing network here: 

This was gifted to us for review but all of our views are honest so rest assured we’d never recommend anything we don’t like. Our Review and Affiliate link disclosure are located here

About The Book:

Today we are reviewing  Wicca Herbal Magic A Beginner’s Guide to Herbal Spellcraft  By Lisa Chamberlain. 

Myself and  AJ don’t practice Wicca so this review is based on a novice reading the book – if you’ve read the book we’d love to hear your thoughts! 

Reviewed By: Emma aka Bunnypudding 

Hardback: https://amzn.to/3w7IJKg

Paperback: https://amzn.to/3w4LGvd

So let’s dive in. 

The Synopsis: 

Since the beginning of human history, healers and shamans have understood the nutritional, medicinal, and magical properties of herbs. Whether you’re well versed in magic but are just discovering herbs, or are new to  Wicca altogether, this handy guide by popular author Lisa Chamberlain covers all the basics, from creating your own magical garden to the gathering, harvesting, drying, and storing the herbs. She centres the spells around 13  herbs, most easy to find and inexpensive: basil, bay laurel, chamomile, cinnamon, dandelion, elecampane,  hibiscus, lavender, mugwort, nutmeg, rosemary, sage, and thyme. Because they’re primarily culinary and/or medicinal herbs too, you’ll have plenty of options for using the leftovers from your spellwork. The spells include magical teas, baths, and oils to smudging (more on that below), blessing, and healing rituals. 

Books Construction: 

The book is full of beautiful illustrations and the quality of the book was fantastic. I  love a good hardback with quality paper, what can I say, I am one of those people! It’s also a nice A5 size so good to carry around with you when you are out and about. 

Pages: Hardcover: 130 

#Witchytype Book Review: 

The Positives:

I was worried at first that the book would be very heavy on Wiccan practices but pleasantly surprised that whilst it did discuss wiccan elements, it was also a very informative book about using herbs in general.  

It focuses on 13 main herbs which is a great place to build upon your knowledge if you are just getting started and is also a great refresher book if you are experienced but need some herb magick inspirations. 

I loved how she went into the various ways that you can perform herb magick such as in cooking and in teas – I’ve even got inspired to revisit my tea-making practices by bringing in new blends.

The Negatives: 

As mentioned above, this book is great to use if you are wishing to learn about herbs and it doesn’t go too in-depth into the Wiccan side of practising but if you have strong issues with Wicca, and I am aware some do, then this may not be the best book for you. Otherwise, it’s a great little book to help you really get comfortable working with herbs. 

My one and only personal gripe with the book is the use of the word ‘Smudge’ and ‘Smudging Stick’ when discussing smoke cleansing. I know many people use this word but I personally prefer to refer to any form of herbal or natural wood burning cleansing as ‘Smoke Cleansing’ rather than Smudging, as that is a practice performed within a closed practice of some Indigenous peoples of the Americas. They use Sacred white Sage and hold a unique ceremony for the practice of ‘Smudging’ – so it is wrong to use it as a blanket term for smoke cleansing in general as they are two completely different ceremonies and we need to respect them both and appreciate when something is closed and sacred and when something is open for us to explore as a practice. Hopefully, later editions will tweak this wording. 

Overall? I highly recommend it and will read other works by Lisa Chamberlain. For those practising Wicca or seeking to start the path of practising Wicca then this is certainly a good investment for you but it’s also got lots of useful information for those wishing to learn general information on Herbs and their magickal uses. 

Cat Rating (yes, you read that right) 

3 out of 5 Cats

You can get the Book over at Amazon here which is also where I sourced my images from this post from. 

Have you read this book, what are your thoughts? I’d love to hear your feedback on the comments or on social, just make sure to use the #witchytype when discussing on social media. 

More books to come over the next few weeks but as mentioned above, if you have a recommendation, please let me know! 

As mentioned on my social channels: 

Facebook 

Instagram 

Tiktok 

Until next time Coven, 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: